Description

I own no land, instead I have wheelestate. I’ve been a full time RVer since 1997. Working summers as a Park Ranger takes me to many beautiful places and playing during the winter takes me to many more. This blog is simply the story of my life's adventures.

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Saturday, May 15, 2010

Hiking Havasu Canyon Mooney Falls Day 2 Part 3

01 Chain along trail looking down on Havasu Creek below Mooney Falls Havasupai Indian Reservation AZ (600x800)

The trail to Mooney Falls winds across steep sandstone walls and is not for the faint hearted.

02 Travertine cave formations above Mooney Falls Havasu Canyon Havasupai Indian Reservation AZ (600x800)

Parts of the trail feel like caving past travertine formations left behind by a different waterfall from the geologic past.

03 Mooney Falls Havasu Canyon Havasupai Indian Reservation AZ pano (408x800)

Mooney Falls pours over 200 feet (60.96 meters) of rock less than .5 mile (.8 km) beyond the Havasu campground. It suffered the least change when a significant flash food swept through the canyon during August 2008, but the pool was filled with silt.

04 Mooney Falls pool with workman Havasu Canyon Havasupai Indian Reservation AZ pano (789x800)

Workers digging out silt

A sandbag wall has been put in place and already it is being calcified and covered by travertine. The pools will regain their previous shapes, as the process repeats itself like it has been doing for millennia.

05 Silouette Res dog & Jake taking photo of Mooney Falls Havasu Canyon Havasupai Indian Reservation AZ (600x800)

Reservation dog & Jake, note natural arch

The overlook where we took pictures from…

06 Down stream from Mooney Falls Havasu Canyon Havasupai Indian Reservation AZ (600x800)

…provided great views of the falls and down canyon.

07 Descend at your own risk sign through hole in rock above Mooney Falls Havasu Canyon Havasupai Indian Reservation AZ (800x600)

Yet the continuing trail to the base of the falls requires climbing rock steps through the travertine, holding chain while negotiating slippery rocks and climbing two ladders.

08 Workmen coming up from Mooney Falls pool Havasu Canyon Havasupai Indian Reservation AZ (800x600)

Workers coming up from pool

Cloudy sky with possible rain in the forecast plus the treacherous looking climb to the base of the falls put us off for the day.

09 Gaelyn in travertine cave opening that descends to base of Mooney Falls Havasu Canyon Havasupai Indian Reservation AZ (600x800)

Did we return?

18 comments:

The Giraffe Head Tree said...

Amazing blog, Gaelyn. We all enjoy experiencing the inner workings of the Grand Canyon through your eyes.

...if YOU didn't return then who the heck is writing your BLOG?! LOL!

Food, Fun and Life in the Charente said...

Amazing photos, you obviously have a head for heights! Diane

Bibi said...

I guess you DID return, unless there's wireless down there. When I lived in southern France, I descended through a hole in the ground which led to a long underground cavern (it had been previously explored and the person I was with knew it). DARK down there and VERY narrow. I don't know if I would do it today, but I was young and foolish. Your photos are enticing (I am running out of adjectives) and lure me all the more.

Carolyn Ford said...

Oh, the depths of the Grand Canyon create such curiosity. But, whoa, what a physical undertaking to get out of the canyon when the exploring comes to an end. How fun that hole would be to explore...you go first! I do hope to meet you in the near future along the North Rim...I will sure alert you when we think we can take the road trip over there. I would really enjoy that.

Carolyn said...

Wow what an adventure Gaelyn! Why the need to restore the pools why nnot let mother nature take her own course?
Smiles

Diane AZ said...

That place looks amazingly beautiful, you must've had a great time. Thanks for sharing your gorgeous pictures!

Callie said...

Beautiful country and views but way too scary for me to try and climb. Thank you for the photos of your trek.

Lorac said...

Wow! That looks amazing.I am going to have to put the North Rim on my list of must sees!

Barb said...

Those cave photos give me spinal tingles, Gaelyn! Also, it looks like a long way down if you trip! The falls and the color from the calcium at the base are wonderful.

Martha Z said...

These are beautiful, I am so jealous.
I had a great visit with Barb, she is looking good, seems fully recovered from her heart attack.

SAPhotographs (Joan) said...

Seems like you really have to watch your footing on this part of the trail. I was just about to ask about the sandbags when I read further and got my answer. Thanks. :)

Janie said...

I hadn't heard about a flood pouring silt into the travertine pools. We saw them back in the 90's.
Probably a good choice not to descend the slippery rocks with a storm coming...

A human kind of human said...

Need any more workers to fill and pack the sandbags? How do I apply? Will do even hard manual labour for the privelege of working in such a beautiful place. Wonderful blog!

Sallie (FullTime-Life) said...

Oh my Gosh! Not for the fainthearted or those with weak knees (in either sense). Beautiful pictures. I assume you got back OK -- unless you're blogging from up there ;>)! Please do share more.

blog with no name said...

Wow! Is there anything you won't try? Before we know it, you'll have ostrich rides down the trail into the canyon... LOL
Great trip and great shots of it!

Kathiesbirds said...

What a beautiful falls and what a treacherous hike! These are some amazing pictures!

Firefly said...

The waterfall is breathtaking, but its a pity about the pool being silted up. But nature will find a way...

Rambling Woods said...

Now I know what travertine is...

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