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I own no land, instead I have wheelestate. I’ve been a full time RVer since 1997. Working summers as a Park Ranger takes me to many beautiful places and playing during the winter takes me to many more. This blog is simply the story of my life's adventures.

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Thank you for stopping by. Just to let you know, I'm still blogging but have moved to Geogypsytraveler. Hope you'll follow my adventures. Just click here.

Monday, November 9, 2009

MWT - Death Valley National Park Day 2 - Salt Creek - Part 4


We didn’t beat the early birds but tried to get an early start as planned to see a lot on our second day in Death Valley. First stop the .5 mile (.8 km) roundtrip boardwalk to Salt Creek which you can read about here.

34 comments:

Craig Glenn said...

Wow, you always have great adventures G!

Craig

Sylvia K said...

Have to agree with Craig, you do have wonderful adventures!! Great shots and information for the day!

Have a great week, Gaelyn!

Sylvia

Barb said...

Love the bird prints and those incredible rock formations! Your new Header is awesome, Gaelyn. Stay safe!

Diane AZ said...

Interesting about the ancient animals that used to roam there. I like the pickleweed and shadow over the creek images.

Janie said...

Great photos of the Badlands. Interesting how flora and fauna will adjust to adverse conditions and find a way to thrive.

dowhatyoulove said...

What an amazingly unique place! It's fun to see salt creek again, I am always amazed that those little fish can make it through such extreme conditions. Wow.

Your photos of all the different formations and scenery capture the feeling of this area very well! That would be amazing to see those tracks.

This Is My Blog - fishing guy said...

Gaelyn: What a stark place to walk, hot salty fish in the desert. That is amazing.

The Giraffe Head Tree said...

Amazing stuff, Gaelyn. Pupfish? Who knew?! I hope there won't be a test afterward...

Mike said...

Amazing to see such clear blue skies! Lovely.

Martha Z said...

I was drawn to the same photos as Diane, the tracks across the dune and your shadow shot.
Death Valley is a facinating place.

Yogi♪♪♪ said...

Wow, it is amazing how the various plants, critters, and fish have adapated to such a tough environment. Great pictures and natural history lesson.

Brit Gal Sarah said...

I found all these DV posts so interesting Gaelyn, what an incredible landscape, like nothing I have ever experienced.

Snap said...

It's been years since I've been to Death Valley. Thanks for the memories and taking us on another of your adventures!

Natural Moments said...

I have eaten pickleweed both at the coast and at this particular site and it was especially salty here. I have not seen the pupfish in action either. It would be interesting to see them emerge from their dormant slumber, just waiting for the right conditions to expand.

Karen said...

I am getting an education about Death Valley--I did not know there was a water source there.

Arija said...

Gaelyn, I think you could make hell attractive with your great photos and dry humor. Another wonderful post.

Kathiesbirds said...

Amazing photos, amazing info, an amazing hike! What beauty and mysteries the desert holds!

Elaine said...

Gorgeous! I need to come back and spend more time looking at these when I get home.

Marites said...

I like your adventures very much and that pupfish...i'd like to see that. Got me really amazed. Great captures!

SAPhotographs (Joan) said...

How desolete this looks Gaelyn.

We have trees here which also grow in salty streams and they have one branch with absorbs all the saly so it dies so that the rest of the tree can live. I will show it to you.

Firefly said...

Your posts are never boring. I am trying to imagine these fish living in these salty ponds and wonders what happens when it gets so dry that the ponds dry up.

LadyFi said...

Amazing how hardy those fish are... I love the bird tracks in the sand.

Bibi said...

Pupfish! A fish I can relate to.

Interesting (and very practical) that morticians used salt, too.

Postcards from Wildwood said...

Fascinating and very informative post, Gaelyn. Amazing how everything adapts perfectly to its surroundings. I wouldn't want to be hiking there when the temperature is 111F!
Janice.

RuthieJ said...

It's really neat to see how many creatures are able to survive in this fairly inhospitable environment.

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JOE TODD said...

Great post and love the header. The new Wednesday meme looks interesting.

Small City Scenes said...

Golly Gaelyn I really liked this post. The info is excellent and I learn everytime I visit your blog. Great. I have heard of the Pupfish before, too bad you didn't get to see any. Life is amazing, isn't it. MB

Gwendolyn said...

I enjoy your history for the series of photo you took. You did a great job documenting the area. Thanks for sharing.

Pat said...

Beautiful scenic shots, as usual, Gaelyn. Those Pupfish are tough puppies!

Rambling Woods said...

The first photo looks like it could be a moonscape. I had never heard of pupfish...it is amazing the adaptations that nature can make in order to survive...Darwin would be so happy...

Nicole said...

That's one amazing landscape!
The shots are brilliant and make me long to go there.
The prickleweed reminds me of a saltweed I saw on another blog yesterday.
Wonder if they are related.

Quiet Paths said...

Really interesting post once again. The View from the the east is quite lovely in its own way. And, I don't think I'd ever heard of pupfish.

Louise said...

So interesting about the pupfish. And everything, really, but especially them. Those succulent plants, too!

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